3 Tips on Being a Change Agent

“The only constant is change.” We had Richard Batenburg, CEO of CliIntel, on the show talking about the importance of embracing change. Where do you fall on the change continuum? Are you an early adopter or a laggard? Somewhere in between? Well, if you want to affect change in your organization, but you don’t have the authority, here are a few tips to help you influence the culture: Continue reading

Overcome Resistance to Change

Taking a new leadership position can be exhilarating! We are full of innovative ideas. As an outsider to the group, we instantly see ways the department could improve. We often start making a list of all things we want to change, driven by the desire to make a positive impact! However, we forget a few key things. The department is made up of individuals, individuals who may not have your vision or perhaps don’t even think they need to change. If you want your vision to succeed, there are a few things you need to keep in mind when planning your execution.¬† Continue reading

Why Are We Here: The Importance of Communicating Project and Team Purpose

“And we could be fined for over $200 million!” The bigger picture came after the project had been in flight for a year. Setting and clarifying team priorities and the vision should be done up front, not when the project is behind schedule and the team is exhausted and wondering what the point was anymore. Why do we have such a difficulty communicating purpose and vision?

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3 Reasons to Stop Shooting for the Moon

My philosophy has always been, “Shoot for the moon. Even if you miss, you will land among the stars.” I’m a firm believer in Jim Collins’ BHAGs (Big Hairy Audacious Goals). Dreaming big builds excitement and enthusiasm that propels us into the future. It also allows the creativity to flow and generate new goals and ideas. However, there are times when big goals are simply unrealistic to the point they work against you.

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Lessons from the Devil, Part II: What Not to Do

I would like to continue with Part II of “Lessons from the Devil.” Miranda Priestly, so aptly played by Meryl Streep, is the epitome of what not to do as a leader. Runway’s success is built on fear tactics and power-hoarding. The writing is on the wall with companies like these. When the domineering leader leaves the company, it enters a sharp decline. An example of this is when Lee Iacocca left Ford. The company went from consistent growth to dismal performance. No one was prepared to fill his shoes.

Lead by gaining buy-in.¬†Miranda Priestly leads through fear. The first scene at Runway shows Emily, Miranda’s assistant, receiving a call that Miranda is arriving at the office earlier than expected. Panic ensues and rightfully so. When Miranda interacts with her employees, it consists of berating them for their ineptitude, doling out orders, and bullying in general. Continue reading